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PROVIDE A FERAL CAT A FARM
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Trapping Techniques
Housing Ideas
Get Help before it's out of control!
Stray/homeless/feral cats are often
malnourished from lack of available food,
and get
worms from either eating infected
rodents, or from
fleas. Irritating ear mites
are a common thing to be suffered, as are
fleas.
Some things they eat out of
desperation are so spoiled they make the
cat
sick. If they get an illness, they have to
suffer through it until it passes (if it does),
not having a caring human to get them
medical treatment. They have to live out in

terrible weather,
not having the luxury to
stay in a warm, dry cozy place in
bad
weather
, still having to venture out from
whatever shelter they found to find food no
matter the weather or temperature. They
get into
fights with other animals. Wounds
become infected. They don't get to have a
long, peaceful, comfortable sleep as they
always have to be on the ready to jump up
and run off at any sound which could mean

danger
is approaching. Some wake up to
being
killed by car engines when that
seemingly safe sheltered area up in the
hood of a car suddenly "comes to life",
ending that of the cat.
The humane way to control a feral colony is
to
trap and neuter all the mature adults and
return them to the colony site. If kittens are
caught young enough they can be tamed
and homes found for them.  Trapping and
neutering a large feral colony can take
weeks (or months), and then regular
monitoring is needed to make sure that no
cats were missed. To help identify neutered
cats, many vets clip the top of their left ear
(called
'ear-tipping') which causes no
distress to the cat.

If you find yourself dealing with a feral cat,
or semi-feral population of cats, then your
first course of
action is to contact your
local animal welfare or rescue
organizations. Not all rescues have the
resources or the money to deal with feral
cats but most will be able to
advise you as
to who will be able to
assist. The most
important thing is not to ignore the
‘growing’ problem, as each month that
passes may well see an increase in the
numbers of feral cats and associated
kittens to deal with.  PLEASE REPORT ANY
UN-MANAGED CAT COLONY AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE, however do not be surprised if
when you call most county animal control
facilities they will state they DO NOT DEAL
WITH FERAL CATS.  They do not have the
resources available to deal with feral cats
and most of the time euthanasia is the
protocol for such cats.  We at
NWI Feral Cat
Rescue
try to avoid that outcome by
intervening to help determine what the best
course of action should be.
Humane Control - Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR)
STRAY CATS
Feral cats pose a big problem for rescues,
because they take a large amount of time
and resources (both human and financial)
to deal with. However, the sooner you
report an un-managed feral cat colony, the
smaller the problem! Rescues rely on (to
gain permission to go onto land, or to help
with trapping) local veterinarians (because
feral cats are often trapped at night after
many vets are closed) and they need
specialist trapping and handling equipment,
which is often in short supply. Many
rescues rely totally on
volunteers, many of
whom work during the day, so having time
to trap and transport feral cats is a big
challenge.  With co-operation from
members of the public, and anyone able to
offer voluntary help, the task is not so
daunting.
CO-OPERATIVE EFFORT
RE-LOCATING FERAL CATS/
BARN HOMES NEEDED
Rescues who deal with helping feral cats,
are frequently in need of new locations to
place them, because it is not always home,
(for instance near a busy road, where it is
just too dangerous) .

When feral cats are
re-located they should
be confined to a secure indoor area such
as a barn, containing bedding areas, litter
trays and food and water for up to 3 weeks,
where they can
acclimate to their new
environment, otherwise they will simply run
away when released. Although they will
initially
fear human contact, over time you
should be able to earn their trust to some
extent. Some feral cats may even become

friendly
to varying degrees.

The feral cat’s lifespan is generally not as
long as that of a domestic cat, but with a
caring attitude and with the help of a
rescue organization it can be healthy and
disease free. It has been reported that feral
cats living in a
safe, managed environment
are able to
live out their expected life span.

Ideal homes are: Farms,
Barns, Stables, or
just a rural home with some land with an
out building. Having a small colony of feral
cats in such environments is mutually
beneficial -  they take care of ‘Mouse
Control
’ and you supply them with a safe
home. You would need to provide them with

regular food
and clean water daily, and
somewhere warm and dry to
shelter, such
as a barn or outbuilding.  Feral cats that are
relocated via a rescue group will be
neutered, vaccinated and parasite free, but
you will need to keep an eye on them to
make sure that they remain healthy.
MAINTAIN HEALTH IN YOUR
COLONY
Contrary to popular belief cats can
NOT
sustain life by catching its
own food.  Cats catch mice for
enjoyment and will rarely
consume
them.  Mice are carriers of
parasites such as round and tape
worms which when consumed will
effect the cats overall health.   A
cat will clear out the mouse supply
Contrary to popular belief, cats can
in no time if he/she is healthy.  In
order to remain a healthy and food
and fresh water. Having a well
managed, well fed feral cat colony
can be of great benefit to any one
farm or rural home.
NEIGHBORHHOD CATS  
TRAPPING TECHNIQUES
BUILDING A DROP TRAP
CARING FOR CATS HELD IN
TRAPS
The current financial
crisis has created a
double edged problem
that has really affected
us all.  Fewer people
are spaying/neutering and more are dumping
their pets.  By society not doing something about
this, we all suffer. Populations explosions
spread diseases.
Many rescues have never had so many cats and
kittens, which means that instead of taking your
cat they are saying, no, "we can not take it" at
all.  This means many of those people are just
dumping them (sometimes on their doorstep
after they close)
TIDBIT
FOSTER A
CAT/KITTEN
ADOPT

VIRTUAL ADOPT A
CAT

CAT HEALTH TIPS

HEALTHY FEEDING

DO-NOT DE-CLAW

SPAY YOUR CAT

FERAL CAT CARE

COLONY
CARETAKERS

OUTDOOR HOUSING

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